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7 days ago

Sea Forest
At Sea Forest, we are lucky to encounter some amazing wildlife during our workdays. One charming creature we frequently see is the harbour seal.    

When we snorkel through our sites inspecting plants and hardware, we frequently observe harbour seals hiding from predators, like the transient orcas that feed in nearby channels. Until the area is safe, the seals find cover within the cascading forests of kelp that grow at our farms.  We, in turn, have the pleasure of their company, as we watch them effortlessly twirl amongst the stipes and fronds.  Not only are they graceful, harbour seals are also powerful in the water. When required, they can swim as fast as 19 km/h (12 miles/h) both right-side up and upside down!   

Harbor seals are also phenomenal divers.  While hunting for their diet of fish, cephalopods, and crustaceans, harbor seals usually stick to short inshore dives in waters less than 100 m deep. However, they can stay underwater for up to 30 minutes and have been observed diving to depths of 450m (1476ft)!  

Harbor seals are so comfortable in the ocean, we have probably woken many from the floating naps they enjoy. But for more complete rest and other reasons, harbor seals need to haul out onto rocks, shores and beaches. Once on land, harbor seals are extremely awkward because they rely solely on their front flippers to drag themselves around in a caterpillar-like motion.    

For us, their time on land is a great chance to observe our intriguing and endearing local seals from a different perspective. It’s hilarious to see harbor seals hanging out/resting/lounging in the banana position with their heads raised and their rear flippers held in the air! This never looks relaxing but seals must like it (and apparently it helps with heat regulation). Probably our favorite though is when we catch a glimpse of the close, nurturing bond shared between a resting harbor seal and her pup – that always brightens a workday! 

Follow us to learn more about the wildlife friends we visit while out planting and harvesting! Feel free to share your cute harbour seal stories below.

#WestCoastWednesday #habitatcreation

At Sea Forest, we are lucky to encounter some amazing wildlife during our workdays. One charming creature we frequently see is the harbour seal.

When we snorkel through our sites inspecting plants and hardware, we frequently observe harbour seals hiding from predators, like the transient orcas that feed in nearby channels. Until the area is safe, the seals find cover within the cascading forests of kelp that grow at our farms. We, in turn, have the pleasure of their company, as we watch them effortlessly twirl amongst the stipes and fronds. Not only are they graceful, harbour seals are also powerful in the water. When required, they can swim as fast as 19 km/h (12 miles/h) both right-side up and upside down!

Harbor seals are also phenomenal divers. While hunting for their diet of fish, cephalopods, and crustaceans, harbor seals usually stick to short inshore dives in waters less than 100 m deep. However, they can stay underwater for up to 30 minutes and have been observed diving to depths of 450m (1476ft)!

Harbor seals are so comfortable in the ocean, we have probably woken many from the floating naps they enjoy. But for more complete rest and other reasons, harbor seals need to "haul out" onto rocks, shores and beaches. Once on land, harbor seals are extremely awkward because they rely solely on their front flippers to drag themselves around in a caterpillar-like motion.

For us, their time on land is a great chance to observe our intriguing and endearing local seals from a different perspective. It’s hilarious to see harbor seals hanging out/resting/lounging in the "banana position" with their heads raised and their rear flippers held in the air! This never looks relaxing but seals must like it (and apparently it helps with heat regulation). Probably our favorite though is when we catch a glimpse of the close, nurturing bond shared between a resting harbor seal and her pup – that always brightens a workday!

Follow us to learn more about the wildlife friends we visit while out planting and harvesting! Feel free to share your cute harbour seal stories below.

#WestCoastWednesday #habitatcreation
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Comment on Facebook

When I first moved to Victoria, one of my favourite things to do was feed the harbour seals at Oak Bay Marina!! They're so playful! Some had even learned to do tricks!

tell this to a salmon.

Blake Castelein

2 weeks ago

Sea Forest
Fun Fact time!

Giant kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera) is the world’s largest seaweed growing to an average of 30 meters (100 feet). However, when this kelp experiences ideal conditions, it can even reach up to 55 meters (175 feet)! Giant kelp (sometimes called bladder kelp) is also one of the world’s fastest-growing organisms, lengthening up to 60 centimeters (two feet) a day. With those growth rates, it’s no wonder we refer to it as giant!

Giant kelp are found in cold, clear waters like those off the coast of British Columbia.  Here they can grow in dense groupings that are an integral part of the kelp forests.  These kelp forests are critical habitat for numerous other marine species. Check out our next post which will feature one such adorable sea creature who frequents the kelp forest! 

To learn more about kelp and our company, visit Sea Forest’s website. Here, you’ll find additional photos and videos of kelp, marine life, and our sustainable aquaculture efforts.

www.seaforest.ca

#giantkelp #funfact

Fun Fact time!

Giant kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera) is the world’s largest seaweed growing to an average of 30 meters (100 feet). However, when this kelp experiences ideal conditions, it can even reach up to 55 meters (175 feet)! Giant kelp (sometimes called bladder kelp) is also one of the world’s fastest-growing organisms, lengthening up to 60 centimeters (two feet) a day. With those growth rates, it’s no wonder we refer to it as giant!

Giant kelp are found in cold, clear waters like those off the coast of British Columbia. Here they can grow in dense groupings that are an integral part of the kelp forests. These kelp forests are critical habitat for numerous other marine species. Check out our next post which will feature one such adorable sea creature who frequents the kelp forest!

To learn more about kelp and our company, visit Sea Forest’s website. Here, you’ll find additional photos and videos of kelp, marine life, and our sustainable aquaculture efforts.

www.seaforest.ca

#giantkelp #funfact
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Comment on Facebook

Pam Wood also known as giant whips whoopssh

Beauty pics!

That stuff is gross lol I live on Vancouver Island BC and we have tons of it.

Edible too 😊

1 month ago

Sea Forest
For the love of Kelp. 🌱 ☀️ 🌊 #seafarm #foodie #localfood #allnatural #organic #womanowned #happyplace #fulfilled #mariculture #plants #healthyeating #seaplants #kelp #canada🇨🇦 #pnwlife #entrepreneur #sea #ceo #hellyhansen

For the love of Kelp. 🌱 ☀️ 🌊 #seafarm #foodie #localfood #allnatural #organic #womanowned #happyplace #fulfilled #mariculture #plants #healthyeating #seaplants #kelp #canada🇨🇦 #pnwlife #entrepreneur #sea #ceo #hellyhansen ... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

Now this picture would look great in a aquaculture magazine 🌊📸

Amazing 😀🌿

Ken Johnston

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